Dating current lebanon

No recent population census has been done but in 2007 estimates ranged from slightly more than 1 million to slightly less than 2 million as part of Greater Beirut.

Located on a peninsula at the midpoint of Lebanon's Mediterranean coast, Beirut is the country's largest and main seaport.

The Beirut River runs south to north on the eastern edge of the city. Found on land of the Lebanese Evangelical School for Girls in the Patriarchate area of Beirut.

Beirut is Lebanon's seat of government and plays a central role in the Lebanese economy, with many banks and corporations based in its Central District, Badaro, Rue Verdun, Hamra and Ashrafieh. Fresh grey flint, both sides showing pressure flaking. Several prehistoric archaeological sites were discovered within the urban area of Beirut, revealing flint tools of sequential periods dating from the Middle Paleolithic and Upper Paleolithic through the Neolithic to the Bronze Age.

Following the destructive Lebanese Civil War, Beirut's cultural landscape underwent major reconstruction. Beirut I, or Minet el Hosn, was listed as "Beyrouth ville" by Louis Burkhalter and said to be on the beach near the Orent and Bassoul hotels on the Avenue des Fran├žais in central Beirut.

Beirut II, or Umm el Khatib, was suggested by Burkhalter to have been south of Tarik el Jedideh, where P. Gigues discovered a Copper Age flint industry at around 100 metres (328 feet) above sea level. Beirut III, Furn esh Shebbak or Plateau Tabet, was suggested to have been located on the left bank of the Beirut River. Gigues discovered a series of Neolithic flint tools on the surface along with the remains of a structure suggested to be a hut circle.

Burkhalter suggested that it was west of the Damascus road, although this determination has been criticized by Lorraine Copeland. Auguste Bergy discussed polished axes that were also found at this site, which has now completely disappeared as a result of construction and urbanization of the area.

Beirut IV, or Furn esh Shebbak, river banks, was also on the left bank of the river and on either side of the road leading eastwards from the Furn esh Shebbak police station towards the river that marked the city limits.

The area was covered in red sand that represented Quaternary river terraces.

The site was found by Jesuit Father Dillenseger and published by fellow Jesuits Godefroy Zumoffen, Collections from the site were made by Bergy, Describes and another Jesuit, Paul Bovier-Lapierre.

A large number of Middle Paleolithic flint tools were found on the surface and in side gullies that drain into the river.

They included around 50 varied bifaces accredited to the Acheulean period, some with a lustrous sheen, now held at the Museum of Lebanese Prehistory.

Henri Fleisch also found an Emireh point amongst material from the site, which has now disappeared beneath buildings.